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I hear the question a lot, “can you isolate your upper or lower chest?” The reason this question is asked so frequently is that there is no simple yes or no answer ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The chest consists of two main muscles, the pectoralis major and pectoralis minor ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The pectoralis major is a large, fan-shaped muscle that makes up the majority of the chest muscle mass. It originates at your clavicle, ribs, and sternum, and inserts into the upper portion of your humerus (upper arm bone from elbow to shoulder). It is because of the multiple points of origin (more so the different directions of the muscle fibres from these different points of origin), that you are able to target each portion of the chest to a small degree. Movements that move from low to high (incline bench press), or high to low (chest dip/ decline bench press), follow the muscle fibres of the upper and lower chest respectively. So the answer must be yes, right? Not quite. While it is true that these movements will target the muscle fibres in the respective portions of the chest they do not isolate them, the entire pec muscle will still contract as a whole ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ This is a little combo I’ve been loving lately. Weighted chest dips superset with decline cable crossovers ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The purpose of combining these two exercises is to use progressive overload on the weighted dips and then take the muscle through its full range of motion with the decline cable crossovers

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